Category Descriptions and Examples

Description

Group activities normally involve meetings of at least three participants. For online activities, this should include interaction between participants, rather than just tuning into a lecture or viewing a previously recorded webinar for example. For a mixed mode course, include collaborative elements under category A and personal study elements under Category B.

The examples are not rigidly defined or exhaustive, and if using the Logbook you may describe your own activity under the ‘Other activities’ option at the end of each category’s list. If using ‘Other’ frequently, please note at least one of the other listed codes must be selected at least once per year to ensure that the requirement for two different activities per category is fulfilled.

Requirement

Total minimum 15 hours per annum, including at least two different types of activity.

Examples
  • Lectures/seminars/workshops/courses.
  • Conferences: Fellows are encouraged to attend Pathology Update and/or at least one specialist society meeting each year.
  • Institution or department-based education meetings.
  • Grand rounds.
  • Journal clubs.
  • Tele/videoconference or collaborative online learning and teaching, e.g. web conference, social media-based activity.
  • Supervisor or examiner training, including large group meetings or smaller local meetings with RCPA education staff.
  • Delivery of formal group teaching sessions at higher or specialist health professions education level. Informal workplace-based teaching of trainees and staff is not included.
  • Attendance at institution-based or departmental case discussions involving laboratory results, slides or digital images, microbial cultures, forensic evidence, etc.
  • Multidisciplinary team (MDT), Morbidity and Mortality (M&M), clinicopathological conference (CPC) and other cross-discipline meetings (attending as audience or team member).
  • Workshops aimed at developing skills in techniques, interpretation, or quality and safety management.
  • Site visits for development of skills or techniques. Maximum of six hours per day.
  • Participation in clinical governance or quality-related committees relevant to scope of practice, e.g. drug and therapeutic, workplace health and safety, infection control, transfusion, or ethics (Where there is a quality improvement focus, this could alternatively be included in Category C or D at the discretion of the participant).

See here for guidelines on the inclusion of formal educational activities offered by external organisations in Categories A and B of the RCPA CPD Program.

Description

Personal study refers to educational activities such as reading and online study, relevant to your scope of practice, that you undertake alone, or possibly with a colleague. Teaching refers to formal activities rather than day-to-day supervision and teaching of registrars and staff members. Educational aspects of research as listed may be included. This does not include the practical work of carrying out research.

The examples are not rigidly defined or exhaustive, and if using the Logbook you may describe your own activity under the ‘Other activities’ option at the end of each category’s list. If using ‘Other’ frequently, please note at least one of the other listed codes must be selected at least once per year to ensure that the requirement for two different activities per category is fulfilled.

Requirement

Total minimum 15 hours per annum, including at least two different types of activity.

A Professional Development Plan (PDP) is mandatory for registered medical practitioners in Australia and medical or dental practitioners in New Zealand. It is encouraged for other participants A PDP documents your learning needs and planned activities. Guidelines and templates are available on the RCPA website. Activities undertaken according to the plan are to be recorded separately under the relevant category. The plan does not need to be uploaded, but you should keep a copy in case it is required for audit. A maximum of two hours is allowed for the initial plan or one hour per annual update.

For more detailed information and links to suggested PDP templates please see Professional Development Plan (PDP) and Structured Annual Conversation on the Requirements page.

Examples
  • Literature review, textbook reading or targeted information search undertaken in day-to-day practice or for a practice-based research project.
  • Online or social media-based learning activities, e.g. learning modules, self-assessment programs, podcasts and case studies. RCPA or similar online learning modules for ethics, cultural safety, mentoring, anti-bullying and harassment and trainee supervision are recommended.
  • Preparation of materials for formal teaching sessions (maximum two hours per session).
  • Preparation of an oral or poster presentation for a scientific meeting. Maximum of three hours per presentation or project in addition to literature review.
  • Reviewing grant applications or scientific papers for peer-reviewed journals. Maximum of two hours for each article or application.
  • Writing for publication, including journal articles, book chapters or monographs etc Maximum of three hours for writing each paper, book chapter, book or monograph.
  • Slide/case reviews in preparation for teaching or to develop personal technical skills.
  • RCPA or similar e-cases, quality management and laboratory safety online modules.
  • Reviewing the technical work of a peer or co-worker for teaching and learning purposes.
  • Formal postgraduate study program from a recognised educational institution or professional body.
  • Providing formal mentoring to an RCPA trainee or member. Up to one hour per session.
  • Review of standards and policies for professional registration, cultural and workplace safety, anti-bullying and harassment and professional codes of conduct. New Zealand members are advised to visit the MCNZ website.

See here for guidelines on the inclusion of formal educational activities offered by external organisations in Categories A and B of the RCPA CPD Program.

Description

Review of performance normally involves having your own work reviewed by others. The focus is on being accountable and getting feedback from peers, managers and others for the purpose of checking and/or improving your practice. It can apply to any area of your practice, whether it be your technical and reporting abilities, or your management, leadership and communication skills. It also includes your reflection on feedback provided, and planning strategies for improvement.

Specialists may also provide second opinions and review the performance of others as part of an internal quality assurance process. Particularly where the specialists involved have similar levels of experience it will involve reflecting on one’s own practice with a quality improvement focus. This may be included in Category C.

Activities reported in CPD programs for other Colleges may be included, provided that they have general relevance to your registered scope in relation to your RCPA qualification.

The examples are not rigidly defined or exhaustive, and if using the Logbook you may describe your own activity under the ‘Other activities’ option at the end of each category’s list. If using ‘Other’ frequently, please note at least one of the other listed codes must be selected at least once per year to ensure that the requirement for two different activities per category is fulfilled.

Requirement

Total minimum 15 hours per annum, including at least two different types of activity.

Medical practitioners in New Zealand must also include an annual structured conversation with a peer, colleague or employer, to discuss their educational progress and professional practice

Examples
  • Second opinions, double-reading of slides, internal random or targeted case reviews, with a quality improvement focus.
  • Review of laboratory reports and interpretive comments with comparison against your peer group. This may be retrospective, or as a cross-check reports prior to release.
  • Internal peer review of laboratory processes, critical incidents, quality and safety issues with a quality improvement focus.
  • Peer review of corrected amended reports and complaint resolution.
  • Peer review of pathologist-initiated discretionary/reflex testing.
  • Receiving and reviewing feedback from a NATA/IANZ assessment with formulation of a plan to address recommendations. These may constitute Collegial Practice Visits, previously referred to as Regular Practice Review in New Zealand.
  • Multidisciplinary team (MDT), clinicopathological conference (CPC) meetings and other cross-discipline peer review activities where you are the presenter or leader. If you are attending as an audience or team member, these meetings may be recorded under Category A.
  • Review or comparison of legal and technical reports, expert certificates or opinions; critical conclusion check or other cross check with peers as an internal activity prior to presentation in court or release of final reports to clinicians or legal authorities. Up to 30 minutes for each complex report, or 15 minutes each for simpler reports.
  • Internal review of post-mortem cases prior to sending to a coroner, e.g exit review of cases where the cause of death is not ascertained or has changed from the initial meeting.
  • Participation as an examiner for the RCPA or other specialist college, including preparation of questions and marking guides, participation in examiner calibration sessions, co-marking formal examinations, or being a co-examiner for oral examinations.
  • Collaborative development of teaching and assessment materials for specialist education and training.
  • Multisource or 360° feedback (MSF) to obtain anonymous feedback from a range of people regarding your professional performance. If not provided in the workplace, members may use the Colleague Feedback Survey offered by CFEP https://www.cfepsurveys.com.au (maximum five hours).
  • Performance appraisal from employer (maximum one hour).
  • Peer appraisal of progress with professional development plan (maximum one hour).
  • Peer review of academic activities including evaluation of teaching, research publications and other academic writing.
  • Meeting with co-supervisors and peers in relation to a major research project or PhD thesis.
  • Peer review of management of clinical cases, clinical records, correspondence and reports.
  • Peer review of professional conduct, interactions with colleagues, patients and staff.
  • Receiving formal mentoring or coaching (maximum one hour per session).
  • Participation in clinical governance or quality-related committees.

For examples of suggested IQA document templates, focused mainly on Reviewing Performance and Quality, which Fellows may find useful for their purposes, please see the Templates and Examples on the Tips and FAQ page.

Description

This category concerns the measurement of quality, outputs and outcomes against standards, guidelines, performance expectations, or large datasets e.g. interdepartmental, national, best practice guidelines. There is some overlap with peer review in that it drives quality improvement, but it is aimed more at monitoring, evaluating, and demonstrating the achievement of quality standards and expectations. Category D may refer to outcomes of practice at an individual level, but in pathology they are often more readily measurable at a team (e.g. departmental or institutional) level. Include time spent reviewing and comparing results, planning, and implementing corrective actions if required.

The examples are not rigidly defined or exhaustive, and if using the Logbook you may describe your own activity under the ‘Other activities’ option at the end of each category’s list. If using ‘Other’ frequently, please note at least one of the other listed codes must be selected at least once per year to ensure that the requirement for two different activities per category is fulfilled.

Requirement

Total minimum 15 hours per annum, including at least two different types of activity.

Examples
  • Reviewing or developing policies standards and guidelines.
  • Reviewing laboratory policies and procedures in preparation for an accreditation visit or as a NATA or IANZ assessor.
  • Review of cases and reports sent to external laboratories, e.g. second opinions on rare or challenging cases, or to ensure that reporting from your laboratory meets external standards.
  • Review of errors and adverse incidents, with root cause analysis and troubleshooting if required.
  • Review of complaints/feedback from patients, clients, requestors and customers.
  • Cross-institutional or cross-jurisdictional comparison of laboratory or legal reports.
  • Forensic reviews and meetings involving external agencies, e.g. courts, legal professionals or police.
  • Meetings with counsel, testimony review and major crime review.
  • Receiving and reviewing feedback following court testimony or presentation of completed medico-legal reports.
  • Participation in incident monitoring, e.g. KIMMS, or other mechanisms to evaluate factors impacting on diagnostic accuracy and patient care.
  • Validation of new methods in comparison with published standards.
  • Review of QAP results with a quality improvement focus.
  • Individual participation in RCPA Quality Assurance Program.
  • Morbidity and Mortality (M&M) and multidisciplinary team meetings comparing inter-departmental or cross-institutional/jurisdictional outcomes, where you are actively involved in compiling, presenting or evaluating outcomes with the aim of improving performance.
  • Review of public health or infection control reports in comparison with inter-institutional, jurisdictional or international data.
  • Participation in committees involved with quality assurance or development of standards and guidelines.
  • Laboratory visit for benchmarking purposes.
  • Review of your performance by a high-level service manager in relation to executive functions and meeting departmental KPIs etc.
  • Participating in research or surveys (including RCPA surveys) to measure the outcomes of your own or team’s practice to develop quality improvement strategies.

Audit to identify any gaps between current and ideal practice, e.g. in relation to:

  • Laboratory processes, equipment, and quality control procedures.
  • Service provision or turnaround time.
  • Compliance with reporting conventions, standards, formats, and templates.
  • Accuracy and readability of reports.
  • Selection of ancillary tests.
  • Specimen accession and handling.
  • Workplace health and safety.
  • Compliance with public health and infection control requirements.
  • Appropriateness of test ordering.
  • Communication and follow-up of test results.
  • Monitoring clinical trials.
  • Medicolegal reports and guidelines for forensic reporting and expert witness.
  • Research protocols and outcomes.
  • Education and training outcomes.
  • Compliance with RCPA training guidelines.
  • Workload and time-management.
  • Staff performance and productivity.
  • Security and handling of digital information.
  • Workplace culture and prevention of bullying, discrimination, and harassment.
  • Cultural safety practice.
  • Personal self-care and wellbeing.

For examples of suggested IQA document templates, focused mainly on Reviewing Performance and Quality, which Fellows may find useful for their purposes, please see the Templates and Examples on the Tips and FAQ page.

 

INFORMATION

If you have any queries regarding the RCPA CPDP, please consult the Tips and FAQ page or contact cpdp@rcpa.edu.au.

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29-Oct-2020
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